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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 89 (615 MHz)

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mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

California 9, Us 4, Brown 3, Annette Young Smith 3, Jeffery Betcher 2, Halliburton 2, Hickenlooper 2, Portola 2, Jerry Brown 1, Daniel Homesy 1, Hickel Lipper 1, Steve Ballmer 1, Daniel 1, Quesada 1, Link Electronics , Inc. 1, Nominating 1, Malia 1, Michael Pollack 1, Ms. Annette Young Smith 1, Colby 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    January 20, 2013
    7:00 - 7:30pm PST  

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award, which is an award that we felt was an important element of our vision for the neighborhood empower. ment network and that was to takethe opportunity to acknowledge the contributions of folks while they're still with us. so, the lifetime achievement award is for someone we feel we should take this moment in time and thank in person for their contributions to the city. and i think we have this year's winner epitomizes the kind of person that we should take the time to acknowledge and to go further into that i'd like to actually take a moment and invite now our supervisor district 8 malia cohen who would like to share her opening thoughts on this award. (applause) >> can i just tell you how good it feels to be up here, to look out to see all the people that make everything possible, that really makes san francisco wonderful? and i just have got to give a special shout out. you knew i grew up in the portola for those that don't know. [cheering and applauding] >> right there at the
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intersection of silly man and colby, my parents still live there. that's where it started for me. but tonight is a night that we have abopportunity * to up lift and support and say thank you to all the people that certainly provide me support and provide me the motivation to get up and come to work every single day. this is an opportunity to thank and praise the people that call me stop, that e-mail me, find me on facebook, send me a twitter and pick, found me on next door. i tell you, this is your day. put your hands together. hang in there, we're almost done. but this is the day that we get to celebrate -- (applause) >> i'm calling it the nen-ers. you know what's interesting? i've been around city hall long enough to watch the nen awards grow and mature into what it is today. so, i also want to give a special shout out to daniel homesy who is the originator of
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this. thank you, daniel. (applause) >> also i want to acknowledge his right hand christina palone, the new director, mon, mayor's office neighborhood services over there in that corner. (applause) >> and for those of you that don't know, i represent district 10, that's the southeast neighborhoods. that's bayview, that's potrero hill, visitacion valley, it's a little hollywood, it's dogpatch. it used to be the portola, half of it. my heart is still with you, but i'm glad like the speaker said, it is whole. and that is what's important, is that that neighborhood remains whole so that our city will be whole. you agree? [cheering and applauding] cheers >> so, a few years back there was this little idea to take back the bayview and really began to rewrite the history and the narrative that we often hear about in bayview. and it actually started,
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ironically, with a small little abandoned swath of land that has grown up to become the cuseda garden. and it's the thought child and the physical manifestation of hard work, of a few community leaders that got together and rolled up their sleeves and got to work. and tonight i have the honor to introduce one of the co-founders, his name is jeffery betcher. where are you? get up here. and jeff is going to introduce to you as he escorts ms. annette young smith to the stage. this lady, ladies and gentlemen, is a lifetime achievement award winner. please, please welcome her to the stage. (applause) >> i can't think of a more deserving woman. thank you. come on in.
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jeffery, i love you. >> i love you, too. >> hello, neighbors. good evening. you know, first i have to say that i "heart" the portola, i really do. [laughter] >> this is an amazing win frankly for the whole southeast sector, from progress park down, and it's a wonderful night. great to be here with all of you. my name is jeffery betcher. i am the executive director of the organization that emerged 10 years ago from annette young smith and carl page's work on the block where i live. annette lived across the street from me and started planting flowers here or there around the block. and that changed everything mysteriously. and we figured out over time
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what it was that really created the change, and it wasn't the garden. it wasn't the plants. it was that annette was unafraid to cross the street and give a hug to someone she didn't know, who was radically different from her, and she started to build a personal relationships that have become cusada gardens and now a network of people and places and projects that are really shaping the culture and life in bayview hunters point. it was -- it's been the distinct pleasure of my life, frankly, to careful where you move, it can change everything. but if you're going to move to a new place, annette young smith is the neighbor that you would pray to have. and i can tell you that she has been a terrific friend and mentor, too. she is still the chair of the board of the cusada gardens. we know it's quesada.
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[laughter] >> she is still the board. she is still very much at the heart and soul of everything we do. she is our spiritual mentor, and we love her. we truly, truly adore this woman. and i'd like to introduce her to you and i think you'll understand why. congratulations, annette young smith. (applause) >> first of all, i thank god for being here and i thank god for all of you being here. >> amen. >> and i'd like to thank jeffery for nominating me and i accept the award. thank you. that's all. [laughter] (applause) ♪
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♪ (applause) >> what a fantastic way to end this evening. a standing o. that's fantastic. (applause) >> and a woman who obviously practices actions speak louder than words we need here in city hall. without further a do, we conclude this year's nen awards. i want to acknowledge my partner michael pollack back there. (applause) >> not only does he make me look old and fat, but he's an incredibly talented young man. these amazing videos, we'll get all this up on the web for you
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to share with your friends in the years to come. look forward to future announcements. with that i'd like to conclude the fifth annual nen awards. we'll see you next year. and now we invite you to join us in north light park for a fantastic of food and wine for you to enjoy. thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ ♪>> and it is my honor to introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the
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things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recent transplant to california. i would like to let the governor know that i am happy to be here. it is a good space. recently, governor brown has spent a lot of time, focus, and effort making california a better place. focus on eliminating waste, increasing efficiency, decreasing the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome
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governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause]
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in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest.
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governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they
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wanted to have as their economic future. and try to -- we had 13,that pal over the state and trying to find an economic vision for the state county by county. how do we become more pro- business? we heard people wanted to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards.
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we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legislature is almost evenly divided. if we pass our budget last week with 94 of 100 boats. i think we have been successful and beginning to get past the partisanship. this time to quit playing games and finding compromises. >> other specific things you were trying to do to make colorado more business friendly? >> we have efforts in every single agency of state government to cut specific regulations and red tape. we thought fracking was such a big deal. we have a huge amount of natural
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gas. horizontal drilling and fracking, natural gas has great potential benefits. much cleaner than coal. it is $1.75 per gallon equivalent to less-expensive. it keeps jobs here and does not send billions of dollars to a dictatorship. there is fear about what happens and we sat down with halliburton and the oil and gas services companies. we understand they have trade secrets. we showed what the ingredients are and it took a six months but we got the environmental defense fund to claim victory and have halliburton claim victory. here is a transparency, set of regulations that will protect the public and settle down all the hysteria and kirk -- furor about fracking. i did it when i was a kid
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diyala this. how do we get past that fear and uncertainty and create some sort of predictability to business needs? that became a symbol for our issues. to find the appropriate compromise so we can get on to the next problem. >> would you like to bring us up-to-date on california? maybe give us a sneak preview of the may revise briefly. >> where selling bonds and we're not disclosing materials between now and then. we just have to wait. it will be interesting. that i promise you. the basic fact is california increased its production of wealth, the state of 38 million people and all businesses. the economy is somewhat under $2 trillion.
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there is dynamic wealth creation in many respects. since the time i was last governor, a lot of people and businesses have moved elsewhere or the have died, gone out of business. also, a lot of people have moved here by the millions. we have 38 million people. people thought the green was here a and we have -- and we have all kinds of businesses. twitter, google, zynga, it is pretty incredible. what has happened. a lot of things going on. our budget, we have a mess, i inherited a budget deficit of $26 billion. we have cut that substantially. from the mortgage meltdown that occurred because of the bad
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decisions and this behavior throughout our economy, the revenue in california is up 23%. that is a big number. america, the asset values were destroyed, something like $7 trillion. a lot of that was a bubble. that was popped and resulted -- we have had to manage a difficult situation. even before the bubble popping, there was excess. because the money flows in in a regular amounts, when money is good, everybody feels good. when $14 billion came in, they thought they were king of the mountain and spend it. arnold came in to clean it up. a couple years later, he left town and $26 billion this year.
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this has been the nature for the last decade, kicking the can down the road. not talking straight. the way it is. the way it is, it is a tale of two cities. there is fabulous wealth and
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link electronics, inc. model number: pdr-885 software version: 3.0c in some places it would be food or shelter or love.
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going over the sources of passion. they see all the world for the first time the majority of people everywhere want a good job. they want a job that is above the table. that is 30 hours a week. the real key to that is going to be a local and state government. hopefully the mayor in denver and myself in colorado focusing on how do we create the conditions? we can have brilliant vendors but they can sit on a shelf. you can have all the capital without the right idea -- but without the right idea, how does it improve? the magic there is entrepreneurship. when i was a geologist, i could
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not find a job and after a while we opened -- i stole the idea from berkeley. we werein the first bgrerew pub. that focus of necessity -- we had to do something different. we took it and adapted it. i think that on a much larger scale, we need to find entrepreneurs, people that are willing to put their hearts and souls into that idea, that invention. make sure they have access to capital, and appropriately trained work force, and there is -- government gets out of the way. we need a proper regulation. we have to have it if you are talking about fracking. at that same time, the government has to be a supporter and in every way
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possible have to limit the burden of red tape or excessive regulation. that is -- that is the message. we are in every community, we have certain tribal leadership. many do give back and recognize it is not all about their narrow self-interest. what are those ways that we can accelerate this international job and make sure our grandkids and their grandkids have the same type of tauruses we have? >> if you want to check on the governor's history of innovation, you should google his name and the running of the pigs. [laughter] >> we had the pig farmers and give them the spent grain. they would bring the little
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oinkers. we would have them run around the block. with all the tv and media. >> google, it is something we have in california. >> i have heard about it. >> governor brown, how did working toward innovation change when you do? >> innovation is no problem. it tried to do something that is not conventional and you'll find out it does not look good. i did not get my name governor moonbeam because i was conventional. government is the collection of catch phrases, banalities, and conventionalism. to the extent you depart from that you are stigmatized and reviled. you want to give it an aura of

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